Sunday, 4 November 2012

Sweet Braised Pork Fat





Holidays, regardless of the season, whether it be holy week, undas / fiesta ti natay (All souls' day), or Christmas, Filipino families often find a good reason to congregate, get-together, and party.  That's what we did for the previous undas. We commemorated the memories of our dead relatives, offered masses and prayers, of course.  And we (my uncles and cousins) the living celebrated an occasion that often happens once in a blue moon specially that it had been years since we last see each other.  And so we did party.  We had the usual stuff, singing video-oke from dusk till dawn, alcohol-drinking sessions among them excluding me and some cousins, playing for the kids and the kids at heart, the usual talking with asaran and kantyawan, and of course the mandatory eating which is every ones favorite excluding me since most of those served were red meat and a half-full casserola of chicken only :-(.  That's why I had to bear with the tasteless macaroni salad which was made by someone-without-tastebuds (nobody wants to admit who the culprit was) that  I ended up flooding it with condensed milk so I can swallow the macaroni salad without choking to death (evil grin)

As I have mentioned in my last post, my cousin had 1 whole pig butchered and the recipe that follows is one of the dish that made use of the meat and was cooked by Sangkong Elmer and his wife. You see, when Ilocanos butcher the whole pig, they make sure that all parts of the pig are put into good use :-) from the head to the pig's feet, including its innards and of course its blood.  Nothing is put to waste.  Some of the meat was separated from its fat and skin and the fat was transformed into a delicious oily but non-cloying dish.  My brother in-law cooked a pork-fat dish that is almost similar to this (see recipe of his Pork fat Adobo ) The recipe below however is not adobo.  They actually named it sweet and sour but I can't make out any sour taste.  The recipe did not even made use of any souring agent.  So I named it differently based on the taste and the manner that it was cooked.  

This was really delicious, according to my cousins.  And the proof is that, it's the first dish that was finished.  It's a good thing that I took a picture of this immediately when it was just served otherwise, there's nothing to show. The thing is, I wasn't able to taste it as these pieces of porkylicious fat lodged inside my relatives stomach before I even made up my mind whether to taste it and take my chances with my hostile-tummy :-(


Here's another pork fat recipe for your enjoyment:  Just a warning- THIS IS PORK FAT.  IT IS NOT ADVISABLE FOR THOSE WHO HAVE HEALTH PROBLEMS LIKE - HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE, ETC.  CONSULT YOUR DOCTORS OR DIETITIAN BEFORE EATING THIS.






SWEET BRAISED PORK FAT
(www.myfresha-licious.com)

Ingredients:

Pork Slab, sliced into 1/2" thick - 3 kg.
Pineapple chunks with its syrup - 450 g.
Soy Sauce - 1 cup
Sugar - 1 cup
Salt to taste
Garlic, crushed - 2 heads
Red Onions, diced - 3 large
Ground Black Pepper
Water - enough to cook the pork
Atsuete (Annato) seeds - 5 tbsp
Vegetable Oil - 5 tbsp


Cooking Procedure:

1.  Place the oil and atsuete in a pan ang let it simmer under medium heat until the oil turns orange.  Remove the atsuete and set aside the oil.
2.  Dump the sliced pork fat in a pot and pan sear them until all sides of the pork fat turns almost brown and oil comes out from it.
3.  Add the atsuete oil then toss in the Garlic and stir until it is aromatic.
4.  Add in the onion and stir until it wilts.
5. Pour the pineapple syrup, water, soy sauce, a dash of salt, and ground black pepper and  let it stand for at least 30  minutes.
6.  Bring the mixture to a boil until the pork is fork tender but with a little liquid remaining.
7.  Add in the pineapple chunks and sugar, stir, and simmer until all the liquids had evaporated living only the oil





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© Fresha-licious (04November2012)





1 comment:

  1. Thanks a lot. I'd been asking my cousin how to cook this. I am an ilokano who grew up eating this everytime there is a special occassion in our province. Kudos to you!

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