Tuesday, 13 December 2011

How to Separate Gluten from Wheat Flour

This is an article by Willie Prejean which was originally posted in his website at www.bakingandbakeryscience.net  however, the website seems to be difficult to locate so I lifted the article from http://thebakerynetwork.wordpress.com/

The article basically provides a tip on how to separate gluten from wheat flour.  We haven’t experimented on this yet but we will soon.  This article is very useful and highly recommended for those people who wants gluten free food J

- fresha-licious (12December2011)

© 2011 Fresha-licious All Rights Reserve


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How to separate the gluten from wheat flour

First you must wash out all the starches from a mixture of flour and water as follows:

1. Mix a small amount of flour (about 8 ounces) with just enough water to form a stiff ball of dough.
2. Soak the ball of dough in water for about 30 minutes.
3. Over a fine mesh sieve, and under running water from a faucet, wash out all the starch. When all the starch has been removed the water will run clear. Warning, if you try to wash gluten from soft wheat flour (cake flour), you will be able to get only a tiny bit of gluten from it. Hard wheat flour (bread flour) will yield a large amount of gluten. Rye flour will yield zero amount of gluten.

If you bake the ball of wet gluten at about 400 degrees F. until all the mositure has evaporated and cut the dry gluten in half, you will see how gluten forms the frame work (structure) of baked products.



How to separate glutenin and gliadin from gluten.

Once you have washed out the starches, you end up with raw wet gluten. If you soak the ball of gluten in pure ethyl alcohol, theglutenin and the gliadin will separate out. The gliadin is the sticky part and will form long tiny silky looking strands when touched with the finger. The glutenin on the other hand will look and feel like tough raw rubber.


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Sources & References:
1. http://www.bakingandbakeryscience.net/ by Willie Prejean
2.  http://thebakerynetwork.wordpress.com/

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